Congress wants to stop most Big Tech acquisitions. But that won’t necessarily increase competition.

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The following is an update from Big Technology, a newsletter by Alex Kantrowitz. To get it in your inbox each week, you can sign up here.

When writing antitrust legislation, you want to be precise. The key is to fire a well-guided missile to flatten the competitive landscape, not a dumb rocket that causes collateral damage.

Well, in its ambitious package of Big Tech antitrust legislation, Congress may have shot a dumb rocket. The Platform Competition and Opportunity Act, one of the five bills introduced last week, would effectively put an end to the tech giants’ ability to make acquisitions…


Here’s the full text of the five bills aimed at the heart of the tech giants

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The following is an update from Big Technology, a newsletter by Alex Kantrowitz. To get it in your inbox each week, you can sign up here.

On Friday, Congress introduced five bills meant to combat Big Tech’s anti-competitive practices.

If signed into law, the bills would usher in a new era of anti-trust law, one updated for an age when giant tech platforms rule the economy — not railroads.

The bills address everything from the tech platforms’ self-dealing, to the way they acquire companies…


Big Technology obtained the five draft bills currently circulating around the House of Representatives that target Big Tech. If they’re signed into law, it will be bad news for the tech giants.

The following is a selection from Big Technology, a newsletter by Alex Kantrowitz. To get it in your inbox each week, you can sign up here.

For years, Big Tech crushed the competition with relative impunity, squeezing every dollar from would-be rivals to reach unprecedented valuations. And while their anti-competitive practices may well continue, there are now five draft bills circulating in the House of Representatives that represent the biggest threat ever to their standard method of doing business.

The draft bills, which Big Technology obtained in full, contain just about everything Big Tech’s detractors have hoped for on the…


Callaghan joins Big Technology Podcast to discuss why he left All Gas No Breaks, why his new show is hitting a nerve, and what he’s learned in his travels across the U.S.

Andrew Callaghan is the force behind All Gas No Breaks, a hit YouTube show that featured Callaghan putting a mic in front of people and just… letting them talk.

Callaghan’s recently gone independent, taking his unique interviewing style to a new home, Channel 5 with Andrew Callaghan, and building a substantial following there.

Callaghan joins Big Technology Podcast to discuss why his alternative to traditional news is hitting a nerve, what he’s learned about the American people from his travels across the country, and the factors that led to his decision to strike out on his own.

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Definitiveness is one of Twitter’s core characteristics. Should it be?

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The following is a selection from Big Technology, a newsletter by Alex Kantrowitz. To get it in your inbox each week, you can sign up here.

Twitter is a game played on certainty, where nuance goes to die. The tweets with absolutist statements tend to collect the most retweets, no matter how loose their relationship with reality. And since retweets are the Twitter game’s points — used for reach, influence, and earning potential — people tend to be as definitive as possible on the service, even under the most uncertain of circumstances.

Because Twitter rewards taking a stance, doing so…


This is just the beginning of the pricing surge.

Cameron Venti

The following is a selection from Big Technology, a newsletter by Alex Kantrowitz. To get it in your inbox each week, you can sign up here.

Tyler Rodriguez, an Amazon third-party seller based in Florida, has seen his import costs from China triple since the start of the pandemic. He’s had to bump prices for the toys he sells on the site by 10 to 15%. And he’s among the lucky ones.

Rodriguez is part of a growing segment of the U.S. economy getting crushed by rising import costs from China. Before the pandemic, Amazon sellers and their fellow U.S…


Digging into Apple’s trouble with Epic and its privacy practices in China with Jack Nicas of the New York Times

Jack Nicas joins Big Technology Podcast fresh out of the Epic v. Apple trial, where the Fortnight maker is suing Apple over the 30% cut it takes out of every dollar we spend on apps downloaded from the App Store. Nicas takes us inside the courtroom, explains what’s at stake, and makes a prediction for where things net out. In the second half, Nicas breaks down his reporting on Apple’s questionable privacy practices in China, where the company stores user data in servers all but owned by the Chinese government.

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With community in decline, we counted on work for meaning. But a year in isolation is clarifying.

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The World Health Organization released a study this week concluding what would’ve been shocking if it weren’t so obvious: We’re working ourselves to death.

Working long hours — 55 or more per week — gives us an approximately 35% higher chance of stroke and a 17% higher chance of heart disease, the study found. In 2016, overwork led to 745,000 deaths, up 26% from 2000.

We’re giving our lives to work for reasons both physical and spiritual. In our winners and losers society, where poverty seems to be perpetually looming, we overwork simply to survive. But we’re also pouring ourselves…


Facebook, Spotify, and Apple are all prioritizing podcasts. What’s behind the recent emphasis?

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For at least the past five years, most experts would tell you the podcast market was saturated. Everyone has a podcast, they’d say, and the window of opportunity to break in was closed. Podcasting technology had some room to grow, but an RSS feed and a Play button mostly did the trick. Apple, the company that put the ‘pod’ in ‘podcasts,’ even seemed to forget the genre existed. It updated its podcasting app about as often as Tim Cook praised Mark Zuckerberg.

But recently, and seemingly out of nowhere, some of the world’s largest tech companies have made podcasting a…


Brad Stone is the author of Amazon Unbound, a new book about the inner workings of Amazon. Stone joins Big Technology Podcast to discuss the book, Bezos’s transformation, Amazon’s culture, and what’s in store for the company now that Bezos is leaving the CEO role.

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Alex Kantrowitz

Silicon Valley-based journalist covering Big Tech and society. Subscribe to my newsletter here: https://bigtechnology.substack.com.

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